Monthly Archives

July 2017

Google’s 5 Traits of Great Teams

By | Startup general interest | One Comment

As you may know Google has done an almost obsessive amount of research into what makes a high performing team. This post from Michael Schneider summarises what they found, into five traits that are easy to understand and easy to identify. Very powerful.

1. Dependability.
Team members get things done on time and meet expectations.

2. Structure and clarity.
High-performing teams have clear goals, and have well-defined roles within the group.

3. Meaning.
The work has personal significance to each member.

4. Impact.
The group believes their work is purposeful and positively impacts the greater good.

5. Psychological Safety.
When everyone is safe to take risks, voice their opinions, and ask judgment-free questions.

I love this for it’s simplicity and completeness. Unfortunately implementation sometimes remains challenging.

 

Ten minutes mindfulness a day makes you a better leader

By | Startup general interest | One Comment

Want to see the confirmation bias at work?

Then read on.

I just read Spending 10 Minutes a Day on Mindfulness Subtly Changes the Way You React to Everything and loved it. I meditate for 15 minutes first thing every morning and feel that it makes a big difference to me. As I meditate I can feel stress dissipate and my mind feels somehow less taut. In the same way a flexible muscle is able to absorb more shock than a taut one I feel I’m more able to control my response to things that go wrong or might otherwise instigate a knee jerk reaction. The article tells me that my experience is common and this excerpt goes a little way to explaining why.

Leaders across the globe feel that the unprecedented busyness of modern-day leadership makes them more reactive and less proactive. There is a solution to this hardwired, reactionary leadership approach: mindfulness.

Having trained thousands of leaders in the techniques of this ancient practice, we’ve seen over and over again that a diligent approach to mindfulness can help people create a one-second mental space between an event or stimulus and their response to it. One second may not sound like a lot, but it can be the difference between making a rushed decision that leads to failure and reaching a thoughtful conclusion that leads to increased performance. It’s the difference between acting out of anger and applying due patience. It’s a one-second lead over your mind, your emotions, your world.

Mindfulness is a powerful practice.