Nailing go-to-market strategy

This chart, from First Round Capital’s recent post Leslie’s Compass: A Framework for Go-To-Market Strategy is super interesting. It’s first use is for founders to work out whether they should have a sales intensive or marketing intensive go-to-market strategy. That’s the point of the post and the summary is that if your business has the characteristics on the left hand side then your strategy should be marketing intensive and if you’re more like the right hand side you should be sales intensive. If you’re thinking this problem through at all I would highly recommend reading the whole post.

The second use, which they don’t cover, is assessing whether a business idea is likely to be successful. It’s an obvious thing to say, but unless a business can find a successful go-to-market strategy, sales will be limited and it won’t succeed. The power of this framework is that it can expose fundamental challenges to the viability of a plan even when it is only a concept, and then it can suggest ways to address those challenges.

Simple plans are easiest to execute and in this case the simple plans are ones that are either marketing intensive, or sales intensive. Plans that sit somewhere in the middle are ok, but products that have some marketing intensive characteristics and some sales intensive characteristics have an inherent contradiction that if left un-addressed will undermine success.

The most common and obvious contradiction that we see is complicated and high touch products that are inexpensive (or have low margins). Even if the product is a bullseye hit with what the customer needs, it won’t be possible to persuade them of that fact without an expensive sales effort, which won’t be covered by the value of the sale.

Other contradictions to watch out for include B2C : complex products and many customers : low fit, but the most important one is definitely cheap products that require a sales lead approach.

Business plans with contradictions like this aren’t necessarily fatally flawed, they are just more difficult to execute, and that brings us to the third and final use of this framework, which is to inform product strategy. If there is a contradiction then one solution is to resolve it through product innovation – if the contradiction is between low price and complexity/high touch then either find a way to either to take the complexity out or to charge more.

Usually those product innovations will be to enable a more marketing led approach, and to generalise, companies that move product categories from being more sales intensive to being more marketing intensive make promising bets. The shifts don’t have to be big either – convenience is a winning proposition. Examples are legion, but Slack is a great one. Last May they became the fastest company to reach a $2bn valuation in large part because they succeeded in making a product that works with a go-to-market strategy that is close to 100% marketing led. Looked at through this lens, their genius was in taking all the complexity out and enabling low touch adoption.