Facebook, Google and their dominance of digital marketing

According to the IAB, US digital advertising revenues grew 19% from H1 2015 to H1 2016. That’s very healthy growth for what is now a $32.7bn market. However, when you look at the numbers in more detail it’s clear that this strong headline performance masks a tonne of turmoil underneath.

Display continues to crater and the growth areas are mobile and video, but the surprising thing to me is how much Facebook and Google are now dominating. As you can see in the embedded tweet below Jason Kint analysed Google and Facebook revenues in the context of this market and found that revenues for all the other digital ad players went down over the last year.

This bears out what we’re seeing in practice, which is that startup founders who want to pay to acquire customers on the internet do so on Facebook and Google. These are the channels that our partner companies have been using recently (in rough order of significance, results skewed towards the companies we know best):

  • Facebook – all properties
  • Google (paid)
  • Google (SEO)
  • Partnerships
  • Content
  • PR
  • Direct Mail
  • Flyering

There are a couple of obvious implications of all this. Firstly, evaluating whether a company can get off to a fast start means analysing whether these channels will work (especially the top two), and secondly startups with advertising based business models will increasingly need some super-special secret sauce.

Then there is the non-obvious implication which Benedict Evans of A16Z has been tweeting about recently, which is that as advertising becomes less effective (at least outside Facebook and Google), innovative companies will find new discovery models that reduce reliance on media spend. Amazon has pulled this trick off in a huge way for their core products and there will be big rewards for those that crack it in other areas.