Brexit: Why the EIF must remain

By October 13, 2016Venture Capital

The European Investment Fund (EIF) is an EU institution that exists to stimulate the startup ecosystem by investing in venture capital funds. They have made a huge contribution to the UK scene, backing 37% of UK based venture funds between 2011 and 2015. Moreover, they are often the first investor to commit to these funds making their role even more important than the headline figure suggests. Back in July Bloomberg wrote:

It is an open secret among British venture capitalists that many of their funds would have never gotten off the ground without a hefty check from the European Investment Fund

To state the obvious, if the venture funds hadn’t gotten off the ground, the startups they back would also still be on the drawing board. So the EIF has had a huge positive impact on the UK. It’s a big deal.

And post Brexit there’s a chance we will no longer have their support. That would be very bad news, and might happen as soon as Article 50 is invoked. The EIF hasn’t invested in our fund to date, but they might in the future, so there’s an element of self interest at play here, but this is bigger than Forward Partners and I would still be writing this post if that wasn’t the case.

It’s therefore imperative that maintaining the role of the EIF in the UK is part of our Brexit negotiations. In the medium to long term we could well manage our our own programme for supporting UK venture funds, and the programmes of the British Business Bank augur well in this regard, but replacing the EIF’s programmes would take time and a short term hit to venture funds raised of around 40% would inflict damage on our ecosystem that would take years to repair.

I often get asked about whether the EIF has pulled back from investing in the UK already. There are all sorts of rumours swirling around but the best intelligence I’ve heard, including comments directly from the EIF, tell me that they are carrying on with business as usual. Additionally, I know for sure that one UK fund which closed after the June 23rd referendum has the EIF as an LP.

Earlier this week, David Kelnar of MMC Ventures wrote an interesting blog post setting out the implications of Brexit for UK startups. He included the following passage which describes in detail what we will have to do to keep the EIF investing in the UK. As he mentions, we will need the consent of 33% of EU governments, so this is not something we can take for granted.

The UK’s formal influence over the EIF is limited. The EIF is 60% owned by the European Investment Bank (EIB), 28% by the EU and 12% by 30 individual financial institutions in member countries, with votes cast proportionally. Decisions by the EIB’s Board of Directors require the agreement of one third of EU members. Post-Brexit, therefore, extending the EIF’s core activity to the UK will require at least one third or more of EU members to be supportive. Given the extent to which UK VCs invest across Europe, the attractive returns available from UK funds and the UK’s informal influence, they may well be. Alternatively, other countries may assert their interests to the detriment of the UK.

Other important points are that if the EIF is to keep investing in the UK, the UK will have to keep paying into the EIB, for which a mechanism will need to be established. The good news is that there are precedents, as David notes Israel has a deal which allows the EIF to invest in their country and Norway has something similar.

As with all things Brexit, there is much to do if we are to make the best of our situation. Our task in the startup community is to make sure our agenda doesn’t get forgotten.