Monetisation: Why it matters

I read two great posts advising founders on fundraising this morning. The first was a deck with pointers on fundraising from Jason Friedman of LionBird, which made two points I want to pick out and expand on (the rest of the deck is great too, and well worth a full read):

  • 60% of fundraisings take three months or more (slide 2). “How long should I leave to raise my round?” is a question founders ask us all the time and we always answer 3-6 months. Sometimes we get pushback from people who have had success raising in shorter times than that in the past, and the data shows that 40% of companies don’t need three months. However, it’s advisable to hope for the best but plan for the worst and give yourself three months or more. A couple of quick additional points: people with strong investor relationships need less time to raise; the data in the slide is for the US where fundraising times are shorter than in the UK.
  • Few companies have the luxury of holding off on meaningful monetisation (slide 40). This is another one that comes up a lot. Investors like to see evidence that the revenue strategy works because it removes a major risk in the business (that nobody will pay) and because it improves capital efficiency and hence investor returns. There are, of course, a number of highly successful startups which put off monetisation for years, but they are a tiny minority of venture backed companies characterised by extremely rapid growth in huge potential markets. We all believe passionately in our companies, but unless they can genuinely be the next Facebook, Twitter or Google, early monetisation is advisable.

The second post was on evolving fundraising milestones for SaaS companies from Ash Fontana and Mark Gorenberg of Zetta Ventures. Again, lots of solid advice and well worth a full read. I’m going to pull out the point they made about partnerships:

Partnerships are a distraction before the seed stage [defined as a $2-5m raise]. However, companies can leverage a few key marketing partnerships with complementary product companies to get enough traction to raise a Series A.

It’s super common for founders to spend time pursuing partnerships very early in the life of their companies and super rare for them to make any difference to revenues. Ash and Mark are spot on to advise ignoring partnerships before Seed and to then only focus on targeted partnerships until after Series A. This point hasn’t been spoken about enough and I’d advise all founders to consider it carefully to avoid misallocating their time.