Top 100 venture VC investments each year average $100-150m gain

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This chart is from a Cambridge Associates research report into where VCs make their returns. Cambridge Associates is a service provider to the Limited Partners that invest in venture capital funds that’s known for the quality of its research.

The conclusion of the report is that returns in venture capital are distributed across a larger number of companies and across a wider number of venture capital funds than is widely believed. Their advice to LPs is to catch these distributed returns by investing in emerging managers outside of traditional US venture heartlands. That’s good news for newish funds in the UK.

I reproduced this chart because it shows what a great VC investment looks like. Looking at 2011 and 2012 the top 100 investments created c$10-15bn in value. That means the average top 100 investment created $100-150m in value. One way of creating $100-150m is to invest early, take a lot of risk to get a meaningful stake and hope to get a massive multiple on a small investment. That’s the Forward Partners way. The other way of creating $100-150m is to invest more money a bit later on when the required multiple will be smaller, but the exit value will be higher. Running the maths early stage investors with healthy stakes can get into the top 100 with exits at half the level Series A investors require and maybe 10% of what very late stage investors require.

One of the things I like about the early stage investing we do is that there are many many more $300-500m exits than $1bn+ exits, so we are swimming in a pool with more targets. Another good thing is that if we’re lucky some of our $400m companies will hold out for bigger exits and will end up at $1bn or more, which will drive the returns even higher.

I’m going to finish with a caveat. The dangerous thing for early stage investors is dilution by later stage investors. That’s why smaller funds and angels have a preference for capital efficient companies. In the maths above I’ve assumed that everyone follows their money to protect their stake. That can be challenging for very small funds, although is getting easier with the rise of AngelList special purpose vehicles.