Extremely rapid early growth opens the path to venture capital

“Venture capital is only appropriate for the small percentage of businesses that want to go loss making to grow very fast.” is a sentence I say a lot. As Jeff Bussgang notes in his recent post Growth vs. Profitability and Venture Returns and Fred Wilson has noted before him successful venture funds have a small handful of big winners, and the only way for a company to become a big winner in the 7-10 year lifetime of most funds is to grow really fast – which isn’t for everyone.

Jeff puts some numbers around ‘really fast growth’ in his post, showing that if a company does $1m revenues and then grows at 100% per year for six years straight then it might sell for circa $400m and generate a 10x for investors.

His analysis is spot on, and most investors would be happy if they ended up with a $400m exit with the level of investment he assumes, but in practice they are targeting much bigger exits. Usually $1bn+. In our experience that means they are looking for revenue growth in the early years of 3-4x pa. Moreover, the best companies grow much faster than that. As we know, growth off a small base is easier than growth of a larger base, but when companies have revenues around the $1m level then 5-6x growth is where it gets really exciting for most investors. When revenues reach $10m that drops to 3x growth.

The thing we focus on more at Forward Partners is how fast companies have to grow in their first year in order to get on the venture path in the first place.

Running the maths it becomes clear very quickly that the short answer is ‘very fast’, although it’s sensitive to the size of the opening month, as you can see in the table below.

Screen Shot 2016-05-23 at 12.20.46

For the majority of the commerce and marketplace startups that we work with getting as high as $15k revenues in the first month is tough, so most are looking at average monthly growth rates of 40-50%+ to get to a £1m run rate in twelve months. The way they get there is usually a couple of months of 100%+ growth and then slowing to 20-30% monthly growth.

We pick these numbers (£1m+ run rate and 20-30% month on month growth) because they are benchmarks used by investors. That said, it’s critical to remember that many other variables go into investor decisions and it’s very possible to raise with much lower figures, or to fail to raise with higher revenues and growth if there are other mitigating factors. It will just be harder. There’s more detail in this Path Forward post about Series A benchmarks.