Disney’s new streaming service is the way of the future

By November 24, 2015TV, Uncategorized

I’ve long thought that producers of TV and movie content should build direct relationships with their customers over the web. It’s been slow to happen though, largely because the content producers were wary of retribution from their cable, satellite and IPTV partners if they launched properties that competed with them. So instead of content owners moving to the web we got new web companies stepping into the void – largely Netflix, Amazon and Hulu. To start with they were aggregators in the same way as cable companies were aggregators and they competed with traditional TV companies for content – a happy world for content producers like Disney.

But then Netflix and Amazon started commissioning their own content and it started to look like the traditional TV content companies had missed a trick and left the door open for new players.

But now Disney is pushing back. They’ve just launched a direct to consumer streaming service, DisneyLife, for their content here in the UK. HBOGo is similarly a direct to consumer streaming service from a major content creator, albeit in the US.

You might be wondering, where does this all go?

I think we will see more TV content companies build direct to consumer propositions. That seems pretty certain.

The more interesting question is what happens to the consumer proposition. At the moment most people buy a subscription service from a cable or satellite provider which includes connectivity and a menu of options, maybe have a Netflix or Hulu subscription on top, and probably buy the odd movie from iTunes or Google Play.

Going forward the number of places where consumers can go to buy TV content is going to increase. There’s really value to subscription services which allow for a low effort, lean back TV experience where nobody has to think about whether it’s worth paying for the next show, but there’s a limit to the number of services anyone is going to subscribe to. That points to a significant part of the market going on a pay-per-view model. Maybe that will continue to be aggregated on iTunes and Google Play, but maybe new aggregators will arise which take the show from the content owners site and charge a lower margin. Maybe they will also offer superior browse and discovery.

Finally – this is a cord-cutters vision of the future where access is unbundled from content.

  • Manuel Jaeger

    Great article! I believe that there are some interesting business opportunities in this space. Would love to have a discussion with you about it.