Small funds are in a better place to invest in new markets

By September 3, 2015Venture Capital

In a post yesterday VC Rob Go correctly identified that one of the most common reasons investors pass on investments is some version of “it’s not big enough”. He’s dead right. Most good VCs have a strong discipline of only making investments that can return their fund and that rules out a lot of potential investments.

If a VC has a $200m fund, a 20% stake in a $1bn exit will net them $200m and hence be a fund returner. $200m funds, therefore, should only invest in companies they believe are in markets large enough to sustain companies with an enterprise value of $1bn (assuming they will average 20% stakes at exit).

With the same assumptions $50m funds can invest in markets they have confidence can sustain $250m exits.

When new markets first emerge they are highly speculative with little to no evidence for investors to go on. Then over time evidence accumulates. First there’s enough to be sure there’s a tiny market, then a small, one and so on, until, assuming the best, several $100m+ revenue companies have emerged and all analysts everywhere agree the market is huge.

Small funds are able to take bets earlier in this process and are hence best placed to invest in emerging markets.

 

That’s why at Forward Partners we have kept our fund size small ($50m). We invest at concept stage when there’s often very little to go on with regard to market size and, just like Rob says, insufficient confidence in the scale of the opportunity is one of the most common reasons we pass. If our fund was any bigger we’d have to pass on even more deals.

When assessing opportunity size we actually look for two things. Firstly that there’s reasonable grounds to believe the opportunity is large enough to return our fund, and secondly there’s a chance that the opportunity will turn out to be much larger. Then we hope that as the evidence accumulates it will become clear that the company has the potential not just to return our fund, but to return a multiple of our fund.