Making sense of the bubble talk and the impact on startups

There’s a lot of contradictory advice out there at the moment. On the one hand you have the ‘entrepreneurs should just do their thing and not pay attention to the markets’ folk and then on the other hand there are plenty of observers saying that a bubble has burst.

Many people I respect are in the former camp. Tomas Tunguz said it clearest with his recent post Why the bubble question doesn’t matter which lists the things good companies do and points out that they are the same in bull markets and bear markets. I’ve read posts from Brad Feld in the past saying he doesn’t pay attention to bubble talk and in a post earlier this week Fred Wilson quoted someone else quoting him saying “Markets come and go. Good businesses don’t.” (although he did also point out that if companies need to raise money then the capital markets can affect them).

I have sympathy with this view. Startups and venture funds run for 5-10+ years, are likely to see a recession at some point in their lives (maybe two) and hence need to be able to survive and prosper in both recessionary and growth environments. Moreover, predicting when crashes and recessions will happen is nigh on impossible so trying to manage according to where we are in the cycle is a fools game.

But at same time market crashes changes things for startups. I saw that in 2000 and then again in 2008. When the macro economic climate is tough less money flows into venture funds and startups, so fewer deals get done, valuations are lower and more companies fail. On top that everyone is nervous and deals take longer to complete. Making things worse still, consumers and enterprises have less money to spend and startups find it harder to grow revenues.

It takes time for the impact of crashes to be fully felt in the startup market though. I remember this most clearly from 2000 when I was in a fund that was investing heavily pre and post crash and the VC adjustment took 8-9 months. I think the reaction is slow because VC funds aren’t directly linked to the stock market, VC deal cycles are long, because LPs don’t want VCs to try and time markets and because VCs have staffed up to deliver multi-year investment plans. After a while though VCs find themselves spending more time with portfolio companies struggling with the new environment and the amount of new money in the market drops, and these forces combine to stretch out deal times, reduce the number of deals done and reduce valuations.

Mark Suster set out a number of the dynamics at play in his post Making Sense of the Stock Market Drops in Relation to Venture Financing

Pulling it all together I think the difference between the camps is that the ‘pay no attention to the markets’ folk are talking about best practice startup management in general whilst Suster and others are talking about the impact of crashes in the here and now.

 

I have no idea if the stock markets will continue to go down or recover but it’s pretty clear to me (and probably to you too by now) that if things don’t get better we will get the negative impacts described above, and if they do recover late stage VC markets will continue to get frothier and that will eventually trickle down to Series A and seed.

 

I think the best outcome is that the bear market continues long enough to take the heat out of late stage venture but isn’t severe enough to create a rout.

Until we find out founders should follow the old adage ‘hope for the best, but plan for the worst’, prepare themselves for longer fundraising cycles, and think seriously about taking any offers of cash that are on the table, even if the valuation is lower than hoped for. (And, in case you’re wondering we don’t have any low valuation termsheets out there at the moment. Our valuations have remarkably consistent over the two year life of Forward Partners.)