Film and TV distribution startups please roll up

I’ve just read an awesome description of the disruption going on in all the major storytelling media by one Hugh Hancock. I haven’t come across Hugh’s writing before, but he gets right inside the worlds of film, TV, games, prose, virtual reality and comics, with an insider’s knowledge and a light and witty style.

It’s the TV and film pieces that got me the most. In both cases production is changing at an unbelievable pace with new technology driving down cost and opening up new possibilities. This paragraph from Hugh’s post gives you a good sense of what’s going on:

Cameras are becoming cheaper, sure, but they’re also becoming lighter. At the same time, brushless motors and cheap IMUs mean that robot camera stabilisers are taking over from Steadicams for stable moving shots. And all of that means that a shot which used to require a guy who’d trained with a Steadicam can be done to 90% of the same quality by some untrained muppet (me) with a basic knowledge of how to walk smoothly and a magic box that does the rest of the work. And that magic box means that directors can rethink the rest of their shoot too, changing dolly shots (big pile of kit, couple of big hairy grips to work it) into a shot with a gimbal and a $200 self-balanced scooter. But all that might be irrelevant too because who the hell needs to wobble about on a scooter when you can probably just get a drone to do the shot?

And I could have chosen a couple of other paragraphs describing a similarly dazzling but very different array of changes.

So far so amazing. But the problem is that distribution hasn’t changed and we are now in a world where it is apparently a cliche to say:

There’s never been a better time to get your movie made, and never been a worse time to get anyone to watch it.

That’s a situation that can’t persist for very long, hence the title of this blog post.

That said, media distribution startups aren’t easy. It’s been obvious for some time that the legacy world of TV channels and movie studios is ripe for disruption and lots of entrepreneurs have had a crack at it, yet the old world remains largely unchanged. The biggest reason for that is money. TV and film makers need money to fund their production and the people who control distribution are in the best place to cut those cheques precisely because they control distribution. New distribution platforms have faced the catch 22 of needing to cough up lots of money to get good content to get an audience and needing an audience to get the money to cough up for good content. Netflix cracked the code by building a big DVD rental business and using the cash from that to fund rights acquisition but others have found it more difficult, including many startups that used VC dollars to buy rights and try to crack the code that way.

Still, difficult problems require creative solutions and that’s where entrepreneurs excel, and the growing imbalance between production and distribution can only be making this problem space more tractable over time.