Thoughts on curated marketplaces and perfect competition

Jeff Jordan, now a partner at Andressen Horowitz, and previously CEO of OpenTable and senior exec at Paypal and eBay, has a post up on the A16Z blog about online marketplaces. He argues that all online marketplaces are fundamentally the same and hence should be managed by the same principle of “nurturing and managing perfect competition”.

Jeff offers a full definition of perfect competition in his post that’s worth reading. …. If you want the quick version, perfect competition is when the market is totally open, with full price transparency, full information for buyers and no concentration of either supply or demand.

I agree with Jeff, but only about half the time. For marketplaces like eBay, Craigslist and Etsy he is right. The more they can nurture perfect competition the stronger the proposition will be for consumers and the easier it will be for high quality sellers to rise to the top.

But there are plenty of marketplaces where pursuing perfect competition isn’t the best answer.

Uber is perhaps the most visible example of such a marketplace right now. If they were promoting perfect competition they would allow drivers to set their own prices, but they found that consumers prefer consistency and convenience over price transparency and went for a different model.

Another example is Lexoo, one of our portfolio companies. They are a marketplace connecting businesses with legal services. Perfect competition isn’t the best model for Lexoo because the services from different lawyers aren’t equivalent and buyers prefer to be connected to pre-screened quality lawyers than go through the difficult process of working out for themselves which lawyers are best.

Lexoo and Uber are both curated marketplaces – i.e. marketplaces where the marketplace does some work on behalf of the buyer and doesn’t just rely on market forces to optimise the user experience. There are lots of markets where this is the best model.

  • http://c306.net/ Adi

    Taking your two examples further, may we be able to hypothesise that perfect competition may not be suitable for single product (or service) marketplaces?

    In these cases, the buyer may have come specifically seeking price (or QoS) certainty for that particular product/service.

    On multi-product marketplaces, the key buyer consideration may similarly be variety of products, combined with security of delivery.

    Wonder how such an hypothesis could be treated?