Why writing makes you smarter

I started writing this blog back in 2006 when Twitter was only three months old and long form content user generated content was all the rage. Back then lots of people wrote blogs whereas today most folk rely on Twitter to share their views and news with the world. Periodically I revisit whether I should change from my pattern of daily blogging in favour of more tweeting, which would give me more reach for less effort, but I haven’t made the switch in part because of the feeling that blogging helps with my thinking.

I’ve historically explained how it works by saying that blogging forces me to complete my thoughts, but reading this Business Insider article titled Learning hacks that will maximise your memory I’m now thinking it is more accurate to say that writing makes me smarter. I always love a good listicle, and this one lists seven ways to make yourself smarter by improving your memory. It turns out that writing long form content forces you to do five of them.

  • Retrieval – remembering things before writing them creates new neural connections and strengthens the memory
  • Elaboration – connecting ideas to other ideas also creates new neural connections
  • Generation – creating hypotheses on directions of markets and startup best practice enhances learning and memory
  • Reflection – reading posts back before publishing them is a powerful tool for self-improvement
  • Calibration – feedback from blog posts and on Twitter helps immensely with learning (especially when it’s tough feedback)

The logic of this extends to all long form contemplative writing, whether on blogs or private memos. The nice thing for me about blogging is that the public scrutiny makes it easier to keep the habit of daily posting. If I was writing in a private journal I would find it more tempting to miss a day, or write notes instead of complete sentences.

  • http://damonoldcorn.com/ Damon Oldcorn

    I am just glad you do ….

  • Lukasz Marek Sielski

    Result is that I forget to check tweets or ignore them. But I always end up reading those posts. Why? Tweets bring me hardly any value. Here I learn.

  • http://www.theequitykicker.com brisbourne

    Thanks Lukasz!