Not all businesses can be a habit

Nir Eyal’s book Hooked has become the go-to manual for anyone wanting to build a habit forming business, and who wouldn’t want to build one of those? Businesses that are part of our regular routines profit hugely from regular custom without marketing spend, and many of today’s biggest businesses have habits at their core. Want to know something? You probably reach for Google. Have some time to kill? There’s a good chance you go to Facebook (unless you’re a millennial…).
But not all businesses can be based on habits.
Habits are, by definition, part of our routines, and most of our routines are daily. When you think about it, it is only a small fraction of businesses that we use daily. The others we find each time afresh each time we need them, or maybe remember them if they have a powerful brand. On the desktop we find things via Google and we also use Google to help us remember the brands we only half recall, and that has worked fine. Booking holidays, buying clothes, fixing up our houses – these are all examples of things we spend big money on but don’t interact with regularly enough to build a habit.
Apps are changing the game for these non-habit forming businesses on mobile.
Habit forming businesses are able to get an icon on our home screens and maybe lure us back via notifications. Non-habit forming businesses, which you could define as those which we don’t want to download an app for, are challenged by the fact that traffic is now predominantly on mobile and skews more that way each month (Baby2body, one of our partner companies, gets 91% of it’s traffic from mobile), and that within mobile an increasing share of time is spent in apps.
The solution to this problem is not yet clear, although there are some hints. What we need is a mobile equivalent to Google search, including paid marketing (these things exist on mobile, but the user experience isn’t equivalent). I suspect the answer will lie in a combination of services being surfaced through contextual app platforms, of which maps, messaging and maybe calendars are the most obvious, and a much smarter notification stream.
Facebook’s new Messenger Platform is a sign they are thinking this way about the future and in China Baidu maps already acts as such an app platform for millions of users.
How this plays out, and how quickly, is critical for the mobile strategies of most ecommerce companies, including many of our partner companies.