Don’t let your startup fail for a preventable reason

CBInsights analysed 101 startup post mortems and found the following reasons for failure:

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Many of these can be prevented with discipline. My friend Stephen Allott who was CEO of Micromuse, a UK startup that peaked with a $3bn valuation on NASDAQ, once described managing a startup as a process of identifying problems, putting a box round them and then finding and implementing solutions. Taking that approach it is possible to avoid failing for many of the reasons on this list.

E.g. failing because the team isn’t right is preventable in most cases. It’s difficult, because it takes discipline to look at team questions thoroughly and real courage to address issues when they arise, but discipline and courage are two of the things that separate great entrepreneurs from the rest.

Going further down the list, poor marketing, ignoring customers and losing focus are all also questions of discipline and execution.

Going back to the top, even failing because there is ‘no market need’ shouldn’t really happen. Taking the ‘identifying problems’ approach I described above you would make establishing market need the number one priority. That puts you in the mindset of testing demand before you put much effort into building a company, and if it turns out there is no market lead it feels more like an experiment that didn’t yield the result you hoped for than a failed company.

The big take away here is to be structured and deliberate about the way you build your business and to face the hard problems first.