Carrier decks losing share rapidly

By December 21, 2009Mobile

We’ve seen this movie before, but on the wired web.  Ten years ago BT and other ISPs had portal aspirations which they ultimately abandoned.  Now as devices improve and mobile internet usage gets more sophisticated wireless carriers are seeing their market share erode.  How long before one of them does a deal with Yahoo! or Google to match the BT-Yahoo deal from earlier this decade?

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This slide comes from one of the Mary Meeker/Morgan Stanley presentations published last week.  Their key message is that mobile is coming faster than most people think and it will be bigger than most people think.

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  • Thanks for the slide, Nic.

    I worked in the mobile value-added services sphere as a third party supplier for years and we talked a lot about (and encountered constantly) the network operators' propensity for wanting to leverage their relationship with the customer (and therefore garnering most of the VAS revenue) by owning the pipe and the majority of the ecosystem.

    We also talked a lot about how that plan would ultimately fail.

    This was 7 years ago.

  • I know! It is amazing how much time it has taken (and how much opportunity has been lost)

  • I know! Think about how rapidly things in the app and mobile Internet space have moved since the iPhone arrived demonstrating the consumer's appetite for such things. We could be so much further along if the whole chain had been liberalised years ago.

  • Thanks for the slide, Nic.

    I worked in the mobile value-added services sphere as a third party supplier for years and we talked a lot about (and encountered constantly) the network operators' propensity for wanting to leverage their relationship with the customer (and therefore garnering most of the VAS revenue) by owning the pipe and the majority of the ecosystem.

    We also talked a lot about how that plan would ultimately fail.

    This was 7 years ago.

  • I know! It is amazing how much time it has taken (and how much opportunity has been lost)

  • I know! Think about how rapidly things in the app and mobile Internet space have moved since the iPhone arrived demonstrating the consumer's appetite for such things. We could be so much further along if the whole chain had been liberalised years ago.

  • Top 4 mobile sites in the UK: Google, BBC, Nokia, Facebook. But it's not comparing apples with apples. When you decompose the ranking, it's 2 'jump sites', and 2 'destination sites'. And thus an interesting race for mobile internet domination.

    Jump-sites:
    – Google: Users use it, to jump to other sites. The Google search field has prominent placement on mobile phones and many mobile internet users take it as a step stone to access their favorite web sites. i.e. Getting to Facebook via Google is quicker than setting up the bookmark & digging it out from the mobile menue.

    – Nokia: does a lot to redirect users to download some cool stuff from their Ovi store. But at the end, the Ovi store is not much different from an operator portal, and acts as jump point to other 'cooler 'stuff.

    Destination sites:
    – BBC – with it's prominent placement on many operator portals – it's a quick access to news and it's the news channel which Brits are familiar with
    – Facebook has prominent placement too. But unlike all other portals, it's a destination site, with high emotional/curiosity value to see what friends are doing, up to, reading, liking.

    Bullish on the operator that finally accepts this 😉