Berners-Lee on the new-new-thing

In a week where we have been talking about the New-new-thing it is good to see Sir Tim Berners-Lee chiming in with his thoughts on the future of the web – courtesy of the Beeb. Like most of us (I suspect), he thinks that the internt driven wave of innovation still has a long way to go and that the web is “still in it’s infancy”.

His thoughts on the future are a bit higher level than those I made yesterday and so not very helpful from the practical perspective of figuring out where the next hot startups will come from, but if anything resembling his vision comes to pass there will have been a lot of innovation and successful companies created on the way.

For him:

What’s exciting is that people are building new social systems, new systems of review, new systems of governance

and:

My hope is that those will produce… new ways of working together effectively and fairly which we can use globally to manage ourselves as a planet.

  • Is there a link to the TBL article?

  • Is there a link to the TBL article?

  • nic

    Good point Terry. My mistake. I will add a link when I’m next in front of my PC.

  • nic

    Good point Terry. My mistake. I will add a link when I’m next in front of my PC.

  • Martin Owen

    When I have seen Tim (and others) talk with passion about the semantic web it all makes sense- however the drive seems entirely intellectual. Getting the tools that will let the end user shape the experience and services the semantic web will afford seems to be a long way from their activity.

    As a recovering academic myself I recognise the research then develop business model – and understand its flaws. It is a recurrent issue. I, and many others, were researching collaborative activity over the internet in the 90’s in both enterprise and public service activities it did seem that we were working in an environment where there wasn’t much interest outside the research field (the millennium bug was a good excuse to avoid IS departments considering any change).

    What would now be considered web2.0 state of the art (like yesterday’s mention of Huddle) were custom and practice. No sour grapes – my business model was getting the next research grant.

    Presumably lurking somewhere in semantic web the next decades thing may be lurking. The other aspect is the notion of URIs and the “web of things”. Surely the consumer end of the web of things will not begin and end with NikePlus. In fact, I have a product.

  • Martin Owen

    When I have seen Tim (and others) talk with passion about the semantic web it all makes sense- however the drive seems entirely intellectual. Getting the tools that will let the end user shape the experience and services the semantic web will afford seems to be a long way from their activity.

    As a recovering academic myself I recognise the research then develop business model – and understand its flaws. It is a recurrent issue. I, and many others, were researching collaborative activity over the internet in the 90’s in both enterprise and public service activities it did seem that we were working in an environment where there wasn’t much interest outside the research field (the millennium bug was a good excuse to avoid IS departments considering any change).

    What would now be considered web2.0 state of the art (like yesterday’s mention of Huddle) were custom and practice. No sour grapes – my business model was getting the next research grant.

    Presumably lurking somewhere in semantic web the next decades thing may be lurking. The other aspect is the notion of URIs and the “web of things”. Surely the consumer end of the web of things will not begin and end with NikePlus. In fact, I have a product.