Your friends blog posts filtered by your interest areas to your Facebook profile page

BlogFriends

I seem only to writing about Luke Razzell at the moment and I’m going to do it again. Why? Because he has just released a Facebook plugin called Blog Friends which takes blog posts written by your Facebook friends, filters them by your interest areas and then drops them into your Facebook profile.

For me this is great.

Luke announces the launch here and you can read Sam’s thoughts on Blognation.
One reason I like it is that I struggle to keep up with the blogs my friends write (the truth – I struggle to keep up with all my blog reading) particularly when they post infrequently and on lots of different topics. This app gets around that by filtering them and putting them in my Facebook profile. Sure I will still miss a few (the posts scroll through in a similar way to the newsfeeds) but I will be much better – and consequently I will be embarrassed less frequently.

It is also a serendipity enhancer – that is to say it puts posts under my nose that I wouldn’t otherwise see and that might be interesting – I’ve seen two great posts today that I would otherwise have missed. Serendipity enhancers only work if they require minimal effort and this passes that test.

Finally it is a classic “your network is your filter” application. I have written before that I believe this is one of the best solutions to the information overload problem and it is good to see something live and in action (to be accurate – it is in private alpha and the friends list is everyone in the alpha which works because their is a good overlap with my friends list).

Interestingly re my comments earlier this week on recommendations and filtering, this is an application where I am more interested in a “flow” of recommendations that might be of interest than a service which tries to guess exactly which posts I will like.  Maybe that is something to do with the volume of posts I read and the relatively short time it takes to sample a post and decide whether I like it.

  • Nic, thanks for the thoughtful post, and particularly for the insightful last point: I agree that “good enough” recommendations are a great platform if one can avoid too many false negatives. After all, that’s got to be an improvement on having to trawl through *all* the posts in one’s subscriptions, right?

  • Nic, thanks for the thoughtful post, and particularly for the insightful last point: I agree that “good enough” recommendations are a great platform if one can avoid too many false negatives. After all, that’s got to be an improvement on having to trawl through *all* the posts in one’s subscriptions, right?