Top mobile apps are extensions of web apps?

David Stone’s The year of the mobile/cell? post gives a new take on the one internet or two debate.

In my last post on this subject back at the beginning of March I cited Tomi Ahonen, saying his post listing four areas where mobile is truly different from the internet had got me re-thinking my strong one internet position (in this post back in October I set out my one internet position which stems from a belief that there is less and less difference between PCs and mobiles).

The reaction in the comments to the March post was pretty strong – you lot are pretty sceptical about the potential for the mobile web, in the short term at least.

David lists the mobile apps he uses:

This seems like a pretty standard list to me, and I would expect that many of you are using many of the same apps.  The point I would like to make here is that nearly all these apps are web based with a mobile extension – which is also true of the Facebook and blogging apps that I use.  This very much endorses a one internet view of the world.  Also interesting is the fact that, with the possible exception of Flickr, none of them use any of the unique features of mobile (location, personal device etc).  This is contrary to the gist of the March post where I cited Tomi Ahonen.

David is clearly an early adopter, and I guess he uses a smartphone – possibly one with a keyboard – but in some way or other these services will filter down to the mass market before too long.  It isn’t only internet geeks who want to know where their maters are or what they are up to.

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  • I dont think its an either/ or situation. Probably you will get a lot of mobile extensions to web apps but also some mobile -focused services.

  • mspoke

    Nic, long-time no comments from me but hope to visit more often again.

    Just been catching up on some of your recent posts, great stuff, really thought provoking.

    With regards to mobile apps, I’d say 5% are useful on a daily basis and 95% aren’t useful at all and are nothing more than ‘toys’ really for early-adopters. I use the Gmail app which is very slick but Twitter, do you know anybody who isn’t a ‘geek’ who uses it or has even heard of it?

    For me all of these apps are great for amusign myself and my fellow geeks but as far as mass market goes then I still think we are many. many years away from significant usage of the mobile web, nevermind apps on a mobile.

  • mspoke

    Nic, long-time no comments from me but hope to visit more often again.

    Just been catching up on some of your recent posts, great stuff, really thought provoking.

    With regards to mobile apps, I’d say 5% are useful on a daily basis and 95% aren’t useful at all and are nothing more than ‘toys’ really for early-adopters. I use the Gmail app which is very slick but Twitter, do you know anybody who isn’t a ‘geek’ who uses it or has even heard of it?

    For me all of these apps are great for amusign myself and my fellow geeks but as far as mass market goes then I still think we are many. many years away from significant usage of the mobile web, nevermind apps on a mobile.

  • Web based, mobile extension…the work we did 18 months ago pointed to this as the main likely scenario for quite a while until the ‘phone’s UI got a lot better.

    As to one web v two, you have the FreeWeb and the TollWeb. Guess which one gets the traffic, unless you just have to use the other.

  • Web based, mobile extension…the work we did 18 months ago pointed to this as the main likely scenario for quite a while until the ‘phone’s UI got a lot better.

    As to one web v two, you have the FreeWeb and the TollWeb. Guess which one gets the traffic, unless you just have to use the other.

  • nic

    Thanks guys.

    I guess it isn’t really an either/or situation, but it is likely to be heavily tilted in one direction or another and having this sort of perspective helps in assessing the likely success of technologies and companies.

    And 5% of mobile apps being useful on a daily basis is a big step forward. For sure this is yet to go mass market, but if geeks are at 5% this year they will be more next and the hoardes will follow soon after.

  • nic

    Thanks guys.

    I guess it isn’t really an either/or situation, but it is likely to be heavily tilted in one direction or another and having this sort of perspective helps in assessing the likely success of technologies and companies.

    And 5% of mobile apps being useful on a daily basis is a big step forward. For sure this is yet to go mass market, but if geeks are at 5% this year they will be more next and the hoardes will follow soon after.

  • I’ve been playing with implementation of mobile apps a little myself and can’t decided between:

    1) mobile app
    2) mobile app of web app
    3) web app that works in mobile browser

    I know it’s a case of the best tool for the job, and Apple’s announcements will kick start option 3. Will Apple’s implementation of option 3 be good enough to start dismissing the other 2, will Nokia/Motorola adapt to some extent?

    As your interested, I use a Nokia N73. No keyboard.

  • I’ve been playing with implementation of mobile apps a little myself and can’t decided between:

    1) mobile app
    2) mobile app of web app
    3) web app that works in mobile browser

    I know it’s a case of the best tool for the job, and Apple’s announcements will kick start option 3. Will Apple’s implementation of option 3 be good enough to start dismissing the other 2, will Nokia/Motorola adapt to some extent?

    As your interested, I use a Nokia N73. No keyboard.

  • anonymous